Shortie Says

Shortie,
I think my roommate is being abused by her boyfriend. She has bruises that she tries to hide and I’ve heard him say some mean things to her. He doesn’t like it when she hangs out with her friends and I see her less. What should I do?

One of the first things someone can do for an abused friend is to let them know that they are there for them. It is typical for an abuser to try to cut their victim off from friends and family. If someone has a friend that is being abused, it is important not to be judgmental. A person can easily say, "I would do this if I were in your shoes," but unless a person has been in those shoes, they don’t know what it’s like. The counseling center located in Mary Walker Health Center is free for students and is a safe place for someone being abused. Another resource is the National Domestic Violence Hotline. Their number is 1−800−799−SAFE. They provide anonymous support around the clock. Services to Aid Families is another resource, their number is (315) 342-1600 or x7777 from campus. It is impossible for a friend to make someone leave an abusive relationship. The best thing to do is be there for them.

Shortie,
Every time I have to do something I’m excited or nervous about, my stomach gets really upset and I have to poop. What can I do about this?

Stress can trigger a range of physiological changes, including digestion issues. When the human body goes into the flight-or-fight response, the bowels empty. Yoga and meditation can help to calm a person down and stop this response. Avoiding foods that increase the chances of creating a bowel movement, such as raw salads and fruits, may also be helpful.