Molly is no safe alternative to ecstasy: Real Talk with Shelly and Ted

Shelly Sloan is the Health Promotion Coordinator and Ted Winkworth is the Alcohol and Other Drug Program Coordinator. You can find them at The Lifestyles Center in Walker Health Center. Shelly received her Master’s Degree in Community Health Education and is certified in Health Education. Ted received his Master’s Degree in Counseling and is also a credentialed Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor.

 

Dear Shelly and Ted,

I heard about Molly at a party. What is Molly really?

Signed,

Marveling Molly

 

Dear Marveling Molly,

In short, “Molly” is the street name for powdered MDMA (3.4 –methylenedioxy-N- Methylamphetamine). MDMA is the active chemical ingredient in a drug called “ecstasy” or “E.” This drug works like an amphetamine (speeds the body up) but its main action is to boost the activity of a neurotransmitter called serotonin that is responsible for feelings of happiness and wellbeing.

Use of ecstasy in pill form was popular in the ‘80s but it died down in the mid-‘90s after an MTV special showed brain scans of users who developed large holes in their brains through their use. Apparently overuse of the serotonin system had burned out their receptors and the tissue hadn’t regenerated. Not only did this decrease the user’s ability to feel happy in regular sober life, effects were seen after just one use.

Although many users think that Molly is a different or more pure form of ecstasy and is therefore safer, they are actually the same drug. Additionally, Molly’s powder form makes it much easier for drug dealers to cut it with other unknown chemicals. We will likely never tell you that any drug is good or safe to do, but this one is one of the scarier ones because of its lasting effects and ability to be cut with other nasty stuff.

Sincerely,

Ted

 

Dear Shelly and Ted,

I heard that there are sex positions that can get you more pregnant over another. Is that true?

Signed,

Prognosis Pregnant

 

Dear Prognosis Pregnant,

If you mean “more likely” to get someone pregnant, the answer is no. There is no specific position that is more likely to get someone pregnant. It has to do with ovulation or where a woman is in her menstrual cycle. The best way to prevent pregnancy is abstinence. If a couple chooses to be sexually active, the best protection against pregnancy is a combination of condoms combined with birth control (IUD, pills, etc).

Sincerely,

Shelly

 

Dear Shelly and Ted,

Since flu season is almost here would it be beneficial to get the flu shot?

Signed,

Forestall the Flu

 

Dear Forestall the Flu,

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly urge everyone who is six months or older to get the flu shot. First in line should be people who have asthma, chronic lung disease or diabetes, pregnant women and anyone who is age 65 or older. That said, there are some people who should not get the flu shot. If someone has had an allergic reaction to eggs or a reaction to a previous flu shot, they should not get one. Flu shots are free for students at Mary Walker Health Center and $20 for employees—look for information about clinics, coming soon! Don’t like needles? If you are healthy, not pregnant and between ages 2-49, a flu nasal spray is available for you! Check with your doctor or county health department for more information. Unfortunately, we do not have the spray on campus at this time.

Sincerely,

Shelly

 

If you have a question you can submit anonymously at www.lifestylecenter.net/RealTalk or send a Direct Message on Twitter @LSC_Oswego

 

Real Talk contributions by Peer Educators: Elsaa Batista, Jillian Bergemann, Halie Bloom, Kyle DeCarr, Julie Jacques, and Racheal Richardson