Cuaron’s ‘Gravity’ innovates in 3-D visuals

Sandra Bullock and George Clooney work well together in Alfonso Cuaron’s thriller located in space.  (Photo provided by gravitymovie.warnerbros.com)
Sandra Bullock and George Clooney work well together in Alfonso Cuaron’s thriller located in space. (Photo provided by gravitymovie.warnerbros.com)

“Gravity” stars Sandra Bullock (“The Heat”) and George Clooney (“The Descendants”) on a mission in space. Bullock plays medical engineer Ryan Stone and Clooney plays astronaut Matt Kowalski, who are working with a team of people on a satellite. Twenty minutes into the movie, Houston (Ed Harris, “Snow Piercer”) tells them that a Russian satellite has exploded and launched debris into space. While at first they are told it won’t affect them, the debris, like in any thriller movie, comes right toward them. The flying debris completely destroys the satellite and ship the team was working on. They end up losing contact with Houston as well, left with only each other in space.

The two actors played extremely well together. Bullock’s character was terrified and lost almost all of the oxygen in her tank from hyperventilating. Clooney’s character was able to calm her down with ease, constantly telling her stories and even asking her if she thought he was attractive.

The two had a dynamic that seemed romantic, or cute, at times. If there is one weakness to the movie, it is a lack of screen time for Clooney. Otherwise the visuals, cinematography and special effects were absolutely phenomenal. Viewers felt like they were with them in space. Camera angles put the viewer in the suit with Bullock, floating around in space, and allowed them to see everything. While the 3-D effects did at times feel over the top, they still managed some epic effects and shots.

The film’s director, Alfonso Cuarón, who directed “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” shows off an impressive range with “Gravity.”

For most of the movie Bullock is by herself, creating the scary environment of being completely alone in space. The film forces the viewer into her shoes, making you ponder how you would react to being completely alone in space while not being a completely trained astronaut.

Overall, the film is successful, providing incredible effects and a solid storyline. There are so many survival movies, including space ones, but Cuarón’s film distinguishes itself through its breathtaking shots and advancement in film technology.

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One thought on “Cuaron’s ‘Gravity’ innovates in 3-D visuals

  1. So the only reason you gave it a 3.5 is because George Clooney isn’t in the movie enough?

    I don’t really think you got it.

    #RIPRogerEbert

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