Letters to the editor

I am writing in response to the article entitled “Student involvement needs remedy” published in the April 20th edition of The Oswegonian. I am writing to take issue with the undue notion that student involvement on the Oswego campus is somehow lacking, inert or in need of revitalization.

I would like to first point out that of the 7,500 undergraduate students on campus, over two-thirds are actively involved in nearly 170 student organizations. This figure actually represents the second highest student involvement rate in the entire SUNY System. Further, the diversity that exists among these student organizations on campus is simply unmatched across SUNY.

Between volunteer organizations, business organizations, club sports, activist groups, fine arts organizations, representation groups and a plethora of others, I would challenge you to find another campus that offers a more diverse learning environment than Oswego. The article questions the environment of the school itself, but doesn’t opportunity and motivation define the environment? To call attention to the opportunity and motivation but then question the environment is perplexing.

As an active student myself, I can say convincingly that student involvement at Oswego is alive and well. In fact, I have personally assisted in the foundation of two fully functioning organizations just in the past year and was privy to the foundation of a third.

As a serious recommendation, I would implore your staff to consider the publication of a new series in which you highlight one or two organizations each week and the work that they have accomplished. I think you would be surprised to find the level of involvement and commitment our students devote to on-campus organizations. I hope a series of this nature would change your opinion on the issue.

Seeing you have not, I would like to take a moment to highlight the tremendous work that our students have accomplished and continue to accomplish and to congratulate them on their continued success.

Student involvement on campus needs no “remedy.” Your perception of it, however, does.