Teenage superheroes ‘kick-ass’

Kick-Ass

"Kick-Ass" flies on-screen as an interrupted version of modern-day super heroes, directed and partly written by Matthew Vaughn.

Dave Lizewski, played by Aaron Johnson ("Nowhere Boy"), is just an average teenager. He goes to school, reads comics, has erotic fantasies and is invisible to girls. Not to mention he and his friends have to put up with alleyway bad-asses most of the time. He asks his friends why no one has ever tried to be a superhero in real life and gets the response "because it would be f****** impossible."

As he and his friends get mugged for the second time, Lizewski has had enough. Deciding it’s time for a change, he evolves himself into a crime-fighting superhero named Kick-Ass to make up for all the people who are bystanders and never do anything to help those in need. He fails miserably at his first encounter with the wrongdoers, but eventually gets better. Finding himself in another tight spot, he gets saved by two other "superheroes" unknown to the world. Hit-Girl, played by Chloe Moretz ("Diary of A Wimpy Kid"), alongside her coach and only family member, Big Daddy, played by Nicolas Cage ("Astro Boy"). The group is out to stop the mob from stealing money and dealing, while seeking revenge on the head of the mob, Frank D’Amico, played by Mark Strong ("Sherlock Holmes").

Vaughn did an incredible job writing and directing this movie. He perfectly captures the everyday life of an average teenager, who isn’t the "popular" one already, like there seems to be in many movies lately. He also opens up the idea of there being modern day superheroes, even if they aren’t perfect.

Every actor was great; not only were they fluid with their lines, but they each fit their own characters to the tee. Moretz was definitely the best, even though she is only a child. Her character’s looks, moves and personality were literally "kickass." Cage’s character, while slightly annoying and overly nerdy out of costume, was, at the same time, loveable. With his smarts and her style the father-daughter pair made a perfect team.

Originally Johnson wasn’t even going to be cast because they didn’t want an actor from London. Plans changed, needless to say, and be glad they did. A character has never felt more real in any other movie (well for the last year or so anyway) than Johnson’s character on-screen. Christopher Mintz-Plasse ("How to Train Your Dragon") was specifically thought of to play the role of Red Mist, yet another superhero and yet again another great choice. He still played the nerdy role as in the previous films he’s been in, but this time with a bit more edge. Perfect choices any way it’s looked at.

One thing to take away from this movie, besides a hurt jaw from all the laugh-out-loud comedy is a very simple message. Anyone can be a superhero whether wearing a costume or saving a cat. A real superhero is the one who doesn’t turn away when there is trouble, but one who does something, anything, to stop it from being done.