‘May Term’ to help students obtain late credits

A new session of classes has been added to supplement Oswego State’s Summer Session. May Term, which will premiere as a pilot this spring, is a two-week session of classes that starts after graduation and concludes during the first week of Summer Sessions.

"Our purpose for trying May Term is to meet students’ needs so that they can complete a course in a short time period so that they can have the larger part of their summer for their summer job or internship," said Yvonne Petrella, dean of extended learning.

"We’re trying to serve students and their needs and we’re also hoping to enhance our enrollment," said Tom Ingram, director of academic programs.

Classes will start on May 17 and end May 28. Monday through Friday classes will be held for four hours per day, while Monday through Thursday classes will be five hours each day.

"We’re certainly hoping to get 15-20 students for each class," Ingram said.

Five or six upper division general education classes will be the primary classes offered because of the difficulty students often have getting into them during the fall and spring semesters, Petrella said. One or two graduate classes may also be available. The exact classes that will be offered have not been decided.

"We’ll be looking for high demand gen. ed. courses," Ingram said.

The idea of a May Term was brought up after many students over the past few years said they would like to take a class immediately after graduation, Ingram said. Other schools, such as Fredonia, also have a May Term.

"Students want to take courses, but they also want to go home," Ingram said.

The classes offered are expected to be available for students to view by February, with registration beginning in the middle of the month.

"It might be something I’d use," said Dan Truong, a freshman software engineering major. "It would depend on the courses being offered." Housing will be similar to what is available for students who participate during Summer Session courses. However, Ingram said not many students live on campus for summer classes. Many students who live off-campus have leases that last through May.

"If it makes people graduate faster then I think it’s a good thing, rather than taking a whole Summer Session," said Sarah McMichael, a junior English major.

The success of May Term will be determined by the number of students who enroll in it and the feedback they give. If the program proves successful, there is a possibility that Summer Session courses will be moved back a week so that an overlap does not occur, Ingram said.

"I think it provides a good option for students," said Lauren Atkinson, an accounting/MBA graduate student. "I would probably use it."

However, other students disagree. Meagan Murphy, a senior accounting major, does not believe two weeks is long enough to adequately learn the required information provided by the course.

"Probably not because it’s only two weeks long," said Murphy when asked if she would take advantage of May Term.

Sophomore zoology major Kristina Berg agrees.

"It just seems like it would be a lot to cover in two weeks," Berg said.

Summer Session classes will not be effected by the addition of May Term and will begin on May 26.

Courses will cost the same amount as Summer Session courses, and will be $700, while graduate classes would cost a little over $1,000, according to Ingram.